Is GC good upgrade from Triton 400? | General GC | Forums

Avatar
Please consider registering
guest
Advanced Search
Forum Scope


Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
sp_TopicIcon
Is GC good upgrade from Triton 400?
December 30, 2010
1:01 am
Avatar
soleful2001
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 89
Member Since:
December 25, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1110sp_Permalink sp_Print

Can't emphasize that enough. ALWAYS carry your compass - two if you have them. I know that things break, batteries die, etc., but I have been carrying a GPS since the Garmin Geko 101 came out, then bought a Magellan Explorist 210, then a Garmin Vista HCx, and when my 210 bricked Magellan GAVE me a Triton 300. All that said, my point is I have NEVER had GPS failure in the field. IMHO it can happen, yes, and woe to the unprepared, BUT you are far more likely to have a GPS failure when you connect it to your computer.

Also, keep your GPS mounted where you are least likely to fall on it while hiking!

December 29, 2010
7:23 am
Avatar
phild31
Nashua, New Hampshire USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1479
Member Since:
April 6, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1107sp_Permalink sp_Print

One piece of advice; Always carry a compass!

Batteries die, GPSr break or are lost and if I lose my glasses I can still see the pointer on my $5 compass but I can't read the screen of any GPSr!

Personally I always have two compasses, a Swiss Army Knife, a pen and my cell phone in my pockets.

Oh yeah, the Explorist 710 is the best GPSr, for any purpose, I have used.

When in trouble or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout

December 29, 2010
5:02 am
Avatar
soleful2001
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 89
Member Since:
December 25, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1104sp_Permalink sp_Print

No I do not use the compass all the time either, but it sure is handy when I am ready to pull out the paper map and yes I do use one. It is also handy when navigating a bearing off trail, however when using my Triton 300 sans compass, I carry my Silva Starter and it too works quite nicely.

December 28, 2010
11:55 pm
Avatar
S!G
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 251
Member Since:
March 17, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1102sp_Permalink sp_Print

To be honest, I have turned the compass off on my eX 710. I'm not sure, if I would exchange the T400 to a GC. If you only want to geocache, it might be okay. If you want to use it on bike, I would exchange the Triton with any of the eX x10.

¡¿ʎɐqǝ ɟɟo pɹɐoqʎǝʞ sıɥʇ ʎnq ı pıp ʎɥʍ

December 28, 2010
11:29 pm
Avatar
soleful2001
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 89
Member Since:
December 25, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1101sp_Permalink sp_Print

I own a Triton 300 and use the free program called Easy GPS. Works great. I get cache details/descriptions on my unit including type and difficulty (I think). Not a Geocacher so much as a Hiker.

More thoughts: I own two Garmins and on Magellan.

the maps on my Triton are USGS maps and the detail is better than on my Garmin.

The Garmin holds unlimited Data so I have 1/3 of the continental US TOPO currently on my memory card.

The Garmin screen is far superior for viewing in bright sunlight and is also more easily regulated in the dark. The Triton is too bright in the dark on its lowest setting.

Reception on my Garmin and my Triton are very close in accuracy and strength.

I think the build quality on the Triton 300 is better than the Garmin Vista HCx.

With all that said, and you will probably not beilive me, you can PM for details if you like, but in my experience Magellan has provided far better customer service.

One other qualifying note: The Magellan Triton at the time was 1/2 the cost of the Garmin Vista HCx. In my opinion the Vista is not twice as good.

I have used both of these units extensively and know almost all their quirks.

I have not used the GC, but if I were you I would definitely consider the Explorist line maybe the 610 or the 710. You will love the compass feature.

September 20, 2010
4:48 pm
Avatar
phild31
Nashua, New Hampshire USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1479
Member Since:
April 6, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
561sp_Permalink sp_Print

For geocaching the GC is very good.
GSAK is worth the $25 to sort caches and load a planned trip to a GPSr.
I just finished a 5 week trip from Boston to Seattle to Oregon to Colorado and back home to Boston.
I used my eXplorist GC on the dash of my truck, it kept up with finding caches at 75 mph with no problems, I have not had any problems finding caches with it.
The GC is as accurate as my T2000, it always gets me close (15ft) to the cache and I get very good reception in heavy tree cover.
The street map shows me where I am while driving down the street, no lag, no problem.

I have used 4 Magellan, 3 Garmin and 2 DeLorme GPSr for geocaching.
ExpoloristXL, Meridian Platinum and Triton 2000.
Colorado, Oregon and Etrex.
PN 20 & PN40.

The eXplorist GC is the best for Geocaching.

I now use the T2000 for hiking, hunting and fishing where I need the topo maps. For 95% of geocaching you do not need a topo map.
Don't blindly follow the arrow to a cache, as you approach it the GPSr will point to the location.
If you expect it to put you right on the cache with-in 5 feet you are going to be unhappy with every GPSr unit on the market.
The best accuracy for ANY unit is about 15 feet. That is a 30 foot diameter circle you will have to search, use your eyes and brains to find the cache.
If you just gotta have everything on one unit then expect to pay $500 to $700. For the money ($150) the GC is far & away the best for geocaching.

When in trouble or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout

September 4, 2010
12:35 pm
Avatar
drabina
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
539sp_Permalink sp_Print

I have tried GSAK and while it works, I just don't like to use additional application to load caches. Looks like I have to use VantagePoint for the basic stuff, GSAK for logs and attributes and I am also using CacheSense on my BlackBerry because even with GSAK, the Triton is little cumbersome to use when it comes to hints, logs and attributes.

I either have to get used to it or look for another all-in-one solution. Plus the current solution costs $35 ($25 GSAK and $10 CacheSense) on top of the cost of Triton GPS.

Thanks to all who replied.

September 4, 2010
7:43 am
Avatar
randyandcindy
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 55
Member Since:
March 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
537sp_Permalink sp_Print

Drabina,
Your Triton400 can show attributes, last 5 or 10 logs, hint, and cache size if you use GSAK or SpoilerToGPX to process your GPX files from geocaching.com See the tritonforum.com for info.

geocaching name: cindy&randy
I (Randy) am the guy, and therefore entitled to hold and control the TV remote and of course the GPSr.

September 1, 2010
4:39 am
Avatar
David
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 646
Member Since:
March 20, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
533sp_Permalink sp_Print

Karma,

I just got back from a Geocaching trip yesturday in Nevada where I spent almost 12 hours on the back of my ATV normally running down rough roads at speeds of 50mph and I never out ran my GC. The problem that I have with it is when I get down into the closest zooms, then it becomes jumpy and at times freezes, where none of my Tritons do. It the next update fixes that, I will probably start using the Triton for the cachine portions of the trip and my Triton 400 on my handlebars. Yesturday I had the T400 on the bars and used the GC for a bit, but then switched back to my T1500 which I love in the desert, because of the Satellite maps. But I do love the paperless caching on the GC and I especially love it when I get home and plug it in and have the unit enter everything into the field notes on GC.com especially for 170+ caches like yesturday. Anyway, the GC does have some bugs with the performance and with the panning on the map screen, but I'm not giving up on it yet - I know others disagree, but the guy that I went caching with is a Garmin guy and he likes it.

David


 

 

 

September 1, 2010
3:06 am
Avatar
drabina
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
532sp_Permalink sp_Print

Well, mainly I am using GPS for geocaching but usually that's tied to a bicycle trip. Not that I do look at the GPS all the time when on a bike but I do track my progress and location of the streets. I do not want to be 50ft ahead of the arrow. Triton batteries are not that bad. I usually go for about 6-7 hours and one set of Sanyo Eneloops is more than enough for the trip (still have 2 bars left after those hours).

September 1, 2010
2:37 am
Avatar
mitchdm
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 20
Member Since:
May 13, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
531sp_Permalink sp_Print

T400 is decent GPS (I have a T2000) but it is not built for GC as the E GC unit, but keep in mind it is no longer getting updates to the firmware since the line isn't being actively developed. While I do miss my topos on occasion, the base map on the E GC is EXCELLENT and having 5-10,000 caches loaded and ready with cache info and logs is well worth the sacrifice of the typos (and in my case) the larger touch screen). Yes, I have GSAK and yes I used it to generate and send caches to the T unit but they never did a good job supporting the GC data in the T series so you have to do macros and hacks to work around the limitations.

I have to admit that I am not 100% sure the accuracy/reception of the E GC is as good as the old T2000 unit, but the E GC is a smaller unit (with smaller antenna) and doesn't eat batteries for breakfast. I also hated the T series Proprietary USB plug that I had to screw in every time.

I lost track of my T2000 for a while and bought the E GC and generally don't regret it...as long as you using it for GCing 🙂

August 31, 2010
7:53 pm
Avatar
ryanr69
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
530sp_Permalink sp_Print

I really wish i hadn't read this thread now because there is a REI local and I REALLY want a topo gps.

So the 400, what functionality might it NOT have that the GC does? I like the GC but its slow and has no topo maps and for someone who likes the wilderness rather than streets, it sounds like the 400 makes a lot of sense.

What are the downfalls of it?

August 31, 2010
6:25 pm
Avatar
drabina
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
529sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks again for replies. I guess I will stick to my T400 for now. I am just reluctant to get GSAK because that would be paying $25 for a feature that should be included with Triton. But since I can get the trial version, I will give it a test. One thing I like is how T400 fits the RAM mount and my bike.

August 31, 2010
6:10 pm
Avatar
EddieB606
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 17
Member Since:
May 14, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
528sp_Permalink sp_Print

You guys are seriously going to tell him that he can use the GC while biking? This thing won't even keep up with you at a normal walk, I can only imagine how far behind it will have you on a bike! I guess you could use it, if you don't mind turning around all the time because the unit had you 50 or more feet behind where you actually were. I'm thinking you are wanting it for turn by turn, right? It don't do turn by turn. Seriously, this thing is strictly for geocaching, and it don't even do that good. Don't waste your money on it. If you just have money to throw away and you just got to have this unit, I'll sell you mine. I'm done with it, my iPhone is a much better GPS.
REI has the Garmin Oregon 450 on sale right now for $249, that's $150 off the normal price. I ordered one yesterday. It will do what you're wanting, and it not too much more than the GC. You have to load street maps on it, but I'm sure you can find them free on a good torrent. 🙂
Seriously, the GC is junk! Stay far away! It has lots of bells and whistles and does all kind of cool stuff. The one thing it doesn't do, is be a half way decent GPS. It will not work for your biking, it's way way too slow.

August 31, 2010
5:03 pm
Avatar
David
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 646
Member Since:
March 20, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
527sp_Permalink sp_Print

Karma,

The GC is a neat little unit, however, in its current state you're not going to be happy with it if you're used to the Triton 400 and actually, the majority of your dislikes about the T400 can be fixed very quickly. If you run the GSAK TritonExport Macro it will add the information that you're lacking in the Descriptions for you. Also, there is a trick that may of us do as far as paperless caching. As far as marking a cache as found, just change the cache type to a Webcam or APE cache once you found it, which can be done in two clicks by putting the curse over the cache and pressing menu and going the details. When you get home you just log all of the ones of that type. It is actually faster than logging as cache as found as the GC. Personally, I'm really, really hoping that the coming update fixes the performance problem with the GC, but I went out yesturday on a high speed caching from on ATVs and we found somewhere between 160 to 170 caches just outside of SearchLight Nevada and I tried to use the GC as my primary unit - though I had my T400 in a RAM Mount my the handlebars of my ATV and my T1500 in the case on my side and after 45 minutes I gave up and went back to the T1500. Also, as you have heard, you're stuck with the base map and the base map only. However, I will say that I got to check out the 710 while Geocaching with Justin, the Magellan Rep., last week and the eXplorist 710 appears to be the best of the GC and the Triton all wrapped up in one unit! I would add to those of us who have the GCs, don't give up on them - there are updates coming in the near future and Magellan is listening to us. I was told at the event last week that the first update will be focused at performance and the second will be focused on functionality and we should be seeing something in the not so distant future!

Just to add one shot - my Caching buddy has 2 high end Garmins and at almost every cache - My Triton was repeatedly more stable and normally got me closer to the cache!!!

David


 

 

 

August 31, 2010
2:57 pm
Avatar
drabina
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
526sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks again for replies. Ryanr69, please post your findings if you get a chance.

One more question. Is the basemap only for North America? I am asking because if I go to Europe and want to bike or geocaching and GC doesn't allow me to load maps, it would be useless.

August 31, 2010
6:50 am
Avatar
ryanr69
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
525sp_Permalink sp_Print

I would agree... If all your looking for is streets, than the GC would work fine.. I haven't done much hunting in the non-wilderness so i cant' atest for how well it works, but i need to drive tomorrow so ill check out a few places and let you know...

August 31, 2010
5:39 am
Avatar
phild31
Nashua, New Hampshire USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1479
Member Since:
April 6, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
523sp_Permalink sp_Print

Here's some screen shots of Rifle, Colorado I just took.
The GC has a pretty good street map built in.

When in trouble or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout

August 31, 2010
3:07 am
Avatar
drabina
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 7
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
522sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks for replying to my post. Triton is nice and works great but lack of paperless geocaching functions is a big drawback. Now with GC if I can't load more detailed maps I may be frustrated as well. I do not need topo maps but detailed street maps are a must when biking. Hmm? Maybe it is time to look for another GPS maker. I do have Blackberry that has Geocaching app but I do not want to use two devices for one thing.

August 30, 2010
10:53 pm
Avatar
ryanr69
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
521sp_Permalink sp_Print

I don't have the Triton but it looks more like a hikers device than a geocaching device.

Some differences I see:

The GC doesn't have any maps other than streets, so if your hiking you are kind of on your own.

The GC has no ability to LOAD maps, meaning, if you are going on hikes, you really need to bring google map printouts with you, as I do. Think of the default base maps as gen1 gps from hertz rent-a-car.

The GC has no built in compass, its GPS based, which means, if you want real quick bearings, you have to bring a real magnetic compass or do what I call the 9-meter dance (move forward, then backward, then forward to get your true location).

With that said, the GC has great support for Geocaching, and for the price you can get them for now ($149 at REI), its almost worth having both of them.

The GC is waterproof, has a LONG battery life (18 hours with the cheapies) and can take a beating.

I used to use a Droid with c:geo and that was nice, but the battery only lasted an hour, and i typically go for 6-7 in one run.

Forum Timezone: America/New_York
Most Users Ever Online: 99
Currently Online:
Guest(s) 5
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
phild31: 1479
David: 646
denisetdoris: 400
pprass: 264
S!G: 251
ShortcutHicksy: 250
jmebd: 184
Sockeye: 170
Caotix: 143
Paganel: 116
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 5
Members: 805
Moderators: 0
Admins: 3
Forum Stats:
Groups: 15
Forums: 42
Topics: 921
Posts: 7306
Newest Members:
savannahtindale, Wat, KHB3, ethanwetherspoon, EmilyAnges, cletachristie0, Robert Temple, OSS-SAS
Administrators: jg_the_Prophet: 29, mike_the_Enforcer: 0, OSS-SAS: 1

Leave a Reply